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Vue du Pont rompu et du pont a quatre tetes a Rome, anno 1770 RO

€350.00

Title: Vue du Pont rompu et du pont a quatre tetes a Rome, anno 1770
ROME-PONTE QUATTRO CAPI-ROTTO-ITALY-Leizelt-Barbault-1770
'Vue du Pont rompu et du Pont a quatre Tetes a Rome.' This optical print shows a view of the Ponte Quattro Capi, the combination of two Roman bridges known as Ponte Rotto (broken bridge) after it partially collapsed in 1598.
Size of the sheet: 37x47 cm., little brownish, small tears but only on margins.
Balthasar Friedrich Leizelt (also spelled Leizel, active 1750–1800) was a German artist and copperplate engraver working from Augsburg.
Leizelt produced a series of European and American scenic views at a time when pictures of foreign countries and people were popular and designed for use in optical viewers. As is normal for these prints the series title is a mirror image because optical viewers made use of mirrors which reversed the image. The Age of Enlightenment sparked a great interest in science, so that optical toys and devices became a standard form of drawing-room entertainment in the 1700s and 1800s. Light, perspective, and multiple images were cleverly combined to create the illusion of moving pictures.
Description: Vue du Pont rompu et du pont a quatre tetes a Rome, anno 1770
ROME-PONTE QUATTRO CAPI-ROTTO-ITALY-Leizelt-Barbault-1770
'Vue du Pont rompu et du Pont a quatre Tetes a Rome.' This optical print shows a view of the Ponte Quattro Capi, the combination of two Roman bridges known as Ponte Rotto (broken bridge) after it partially collapsed in 1598.
Size of the sheet: 37x47 cm., little brownish, small tears but only on margins.
Balthasar Friedrich Leizelt (also spelled Leizel, active 1750–1800) was a German artist and copperplate engraver working from Augsburg.
Leizelt produced a series of European and American scenic views at a time when pictures of foreign countries and people were popular and designed for use in optical viewers. As is normal for these prints the series title is a mirror image because optical viewers made use of mirrors which reversed the image. The Age of Enlightenment sparked a great interest in science, so that optical toys and devices became a standard form of drawing-room entertainment in the 1700s and 1800s. Light, perspective, and multiple images were cleverly combined to create the illusion of moving pictures.
  • Number: 1271426
  • Dealer: Petra Riedel







 
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